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Farm Radio Weekly is a news and information service for rural radio broadcasters in sub-Saharan Africa. It is published by Farm Radio International.

Farm Radio Weekly

Notes to broadcasters on indigenous land rights:

In an interview with Farm Radio Weekly, Korir Singo’ei, the Director of the Centre for Minority Rights Development (CEMIRIDE), said that a video featuring the voices of displaced Endorois people was a key piece of evidence at the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights hearing. Mr. Singo’ei said the video captured everyone’s attention and helped to prove the Endorois people’s historic connection to the land near Lake Bogoria.

You can view both this video as well as an advocacy video entitled “Rightful Place,” both produced by CEMIRIDE with the support of WITNESS, on this website:
http://hub.witness.org/en/rightfulplace

You may also wish to review these past FRW stories dealing with indigenous and traditional land rights:
-“Uganda: Indigenous people fight for land lost to carbon credit scheme” (FRW# 80, September 2009)
-“Kenya: Fifty years after independence, families finally have land to call their own” (FRW# 73, July 2009)
-“Southern Africa: Farm workers become farm owners” (FRW# 69, June 2009)
-“Namibia: Bushmen return to ancestral lands” (FRW# 49, December 2008)

Here are some ideas for related local stories:
-Are there peoples in your country who were displaced by former regimes and who are now resettled, or wish to resettle, on ancestral lands?
-Are there national laws, policies and procedures to return land to those who have been displaced? If so, are they being implemented? If not, why not?
-If peoples have been resettled, through what process did they obtain the right to return to the land?
-What challenges did the people face after resettlement and how did they overcome them?
-If people have been resettled on farmland, do they have the skills and financial resources to make a living as farmers? Have retraining programs been put in place? What national or local organizations – governmental or NGOs – are working on this issue?
-Are resettled people discarding traditional land uses in favour of new uses? If so, why?
-If legal proceedings are underway to resolve a land claim, what are some of the arguments being considered?

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